2012-2013Annual Report on Curriculum,

Instruction and Student Achievement

 

BATTLE LAKE PUBLIC SCHOOL, ISD #542

Text Box: In This Issue

w	District Assessment Results 
w	Student achievement goals for meeting Minnesota standards 
w	Curriculum Review Process 
w	Staff Development Update
w	Response to Intervention
w	District Testing Program
w	School Data Center

Welcome to the Annual Report on Curriculum, Instruction, and Student Achievement. This report is Battle Lake Public School’s opportunity to keep residents informed on developments in curriculum and student achievement.  The Board of Education approved this report at their regular meeting October 14, 2013.  If you have questions concerning any part of this report, contact Jeff Drake, K-12 Principal, at jdrake@isd542.org or 218-864-0517

 

DISTRICT ASSESSMENT RESULTS

 

GRAD Test Results Grades 9-12

                            

The GRAD is a set of tests measuring the reading, writing, and mathematics proficiency of high school students. By determining a specified level on each of these assessments, Minnesota is making sure its students are on track to have the essential skills and knowledge necessary for graduation in the 21st century. 

 

Students take the GRAD Writing Test in 9th grade, the GRAD Reading Test in 10th grade, and the GRAD Math Test in 11th grade.  The reading and math GRAD tests are included with the reading and math MCA tests taken in those grades.  Students need to pass the writing and reading GRAD tests, as well as meet Battle Lake credit requirements, to receive a diploma.  Students who do not pass on the first try will have opportunities for remediation and retesting to meet the requirement for graduation. 

 

Legislation approved in 2009 allows students to receive a diploma without passing the Math GRAD if they participate in remediation, attempt a retest at least twice, and meet all other district graduation requirements.  This temporary exemption affects students through the Class of 2014 at which time revised graduation requirements will be in place.  100% of Battle Lake seniors met this requirement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GRAD Writing, Reading, and Math Tests 2012 Results

Percent of Students Passing

                                                                                          

GRADUATING CLASS

WRITING

READING

MATH

Class of 2016    (9th)

98%

 

 

Class of 2015    (10th)

97%

90%

 

Class of 2014    (11th)

100%

90%

82%

Class of 2013    (12th)

100%

100%

64%

Class of 2012    (Grad)

100%

100%

83%

                                                  

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments – Results

The Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCA’s) – are the state reading [grades 3-8, 10], math [grades 3-8, 11], and science [grades 5, 8, 11] tests and meet the requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).  These tests are aligned to Minnesota’s academic standards and are currently given to students each spring.  Minnesota regularly monitors and evaluates the tests and occasionally creates new series.  In 2013, students took the writing 9 and grade 11 math (MCA II) tests.  Students taking the grades 3-8 math and all science tests took the MCA III series.  In 2013, students took  the MCA III series in reading, and in 2014, grade 11 math will move to the MCA III series as well.

Reading

Every grade level of Battle Lake students with the exception of 4th grade exceeded the MN State Reading average score in 2013.  Battle Lake students have met or exceeded the state average 96% of the time over the past six years.

 

 

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 10

BL-2007

95%

91%

85%

68%

73%

78%

73%

State 2007

80%

71%

73%

67%

63%

63%

62%

BL 2008

100%

86%

97%

91%

61%

82%

79%

State 2008

79%

72%

73%

70%

65%

66%

71%

BL 2009

94%

85%

77%

92%

82%

68%

82%

State 2009

78%

75%

72%

73%

65%

60%

74%

BL 2010

93%

84%

97%

84%

74%

79%

86%

State 2010

76%

73%

76%

72%

66%

68%

75%

BL 2011

86%

86%

95%

89%

70%

84%

91%

State 2011

79%

75%

80%

75%

70%

68%

75%

BL 2012

84%

87%

81%

86%

85%

75%

90%

State 2012

80%

75%

79%

76%

71%

72%

77%

BL 2013

63%

47%

86%

76%

70%

72%

89%

State 2013

57%

54%

64%

59%

54%

54%

62%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mathematics

Six of the seven grade levels tested of Battle Lake students met or exceeded the MN State Math average score in 2013.  Battle Lake students have met or exceeded the state average 81% of the time over the past six years.  *Note:  The 2011 and 2012 scores are based on the MCA III series for grades 3-8.

 

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 11

BL 2007

98%

89%

67%

68%

57%

63%

23%

State 2007

79%

71%

63%

63%

61%

59%

32%

BL 2008

94%

91%

85%

82%

59%

58%

35%

State 2008

81%

72%

66%

65%

61%

58%

34%

BL 2009

97%

85%

68%

81%

73%

59%

41%

State 2009

82%

75%

66%

64%

63%

60%

42%

BL 2010

93%

92%

78%

93%

77%

70%

37%

State 2010

83%

77%

69%

69%

64%

59%

43%

*BL 2011

64%

79%

58%

64%

68%

68%

47%

*State 2011

70%

67%

54%

50%

52%

53%

49%

*BL 2012

77%

73%

70%

83%

76%

93%

50%

*State 2012

76%

73%

62%

60%

59%

62%

42%

BL 2013

86%

68%

85%

85%

72%

80%

82%

State 2013

72%

71%

60%

57%

56%

59%

66%

 

Science

Beginning in 2008, students in grades five, eight, and ten completed the MCA-II science assessment.  In 2013 students completed the MCA-III’s for science.  The high school test is a life science test given to students as they complete their biology course.  The computer-based assessments are designed to be interactive and allow students to simulate experiments and provide responses online.  The science test results do not count toward student graduation requirements or the federal No Child Left Behind Act. 

Battle Lake students have met or exceeded the state percentage 72% of the time over the past five years, however, the grade 10 results have been below the state average in 4 of the past 6 years. 

SCIENCE

Grade 5

Grade 8

Grade 10

BL 2008

85%

58%

21%

State 2008

39%

38%

43%

BL 2009

66%

39%

40%

State 2009

45%

43%

50%

BL 2010

89%

64%

70%

State 2010

46%

48%

52%

BL 2011

85%

59%

44%

State 2011

46%

44%

54%

BL 2012

81%

51%

56%

State 2012

58%

42%

52%

BL 2013

96%

61%

44%

State 2013

60%

44%

53%

 

 

 

The ACT is the most common four year college entrance exam in the Midwest.  Students can attain a top score of 36 in each subject area and for the composite score.  Since only students considering a four year college degree typically take the exam, it is difficult to assess performance across school districts.  This is due to the variation of the percentage of students who take the exam.  As a general rule of thumb, greater percentages of students taking the exam tend to the lower the district’s average composite score.  Battle Lake had three students in the graduating class of 2014 receive and ACT composite score of 30 or higher. This is the highest number of students receiving a score of 30 or higher in the last ten years.

ACT Results

 

 

English BL

English State

Math BL

Math State

Reading BL

Reading State

Science BL

Science State

Composite BL

Composite State

2005

19.4

21.6

20.6

22.1

21.2

22.7

21.6

22.4

20.8

22.3

2006

19.8

21.6

20.8

22.1

21.4

22.6

22

22.3

21.1

22.3

2007

20.1

21.8

20.8

22.5

20.7

22.8

21.4

22.5

20.9

22.5

2008

20.1

21.9

20.8

22.6

20.3

23

20.4

22.5

20.5

22.6

2009

20.4

22

21

22.7

20.3

23.1

21.3

22.6

20.9

22.7

2010

21.4

22.3

21.9

22.9

21.1

23.2

21.6

22.8

21.6

22.9

2011

21.4

22.3

22.7

23

20.9

22.9

22.3

22.8

22.0

22.9

2012

21.2

22.1

22.4

23

22.6

22.9

22.9

22.7

22.4

22.8

2013

20.7

22.2

22

23.1

21.3

23.1

22.3

22.9

21.7

23

 

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT GOALS

Battle Lake’s student achievement goal for meeting the Minnesota state academic standards is to strive for continuous improvement in the newly created Multiple Measurements Rating (MMR) system.   The new system evaluates schools on a number of equally measured criteria:

·         Proficiency – Meeting standards on state assessments

·         Student growth – Year-to-year progress

·         Achievement gap reduction – Closing the performance gaps among groups of students

·         Graduation rate – percentage of students graduating from high school

Along with the new MMR scores, there are three new designations that some schools – those that receive federal Title 1 funding - will receive:

·         Reward School: The highest-performing 15% of Title I schools in the state. In 2013, the high school was named a Reward School for the third consecutive year.  Only two other high schools in the entire state, both charter schools, can say that.  Reward Schools will be recognized for their good work and MDE will look to share any best practices taking place in their classrooms with other schools across the state.

·         Focus School: The 10% of Title I schools making the biggest contribution to the state’s achievement gap. These schools must create a plan of improvement that directly addresses poor performance either within a subgroup, or in graduation rates.

·         Priority School: The five percent most-persistently low-performing Title I schools in the state. These schools must create a plan of improvement and will receive additional state support.

Battle Lake Secondary School was named a reward school in 2013 with a MMR score of 69.87% which places it in the top 15% of Title I schools based on the Multiple Measurements Rating.  Battle Lake Elementary scored an MMR of 79.66% which left it in the upper levels of Minnesota schools.  Battle Lake Elementary is currently designated as a Celebration Eligible school with scores between the 60th and 85th percentile of top performing schools. 

 

 

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PROCESS

Curriculum improvement is an ongoing process for the Battle Lake School District.  The district follows a curriculum review cycle to periodically review and evaluate each subject area to guide district instruction and curriculum improvement.  This process keeps the district’s curriculum current and effective.  You can access information regarding Battle Lake School’s curriculum, including the current curriculum cycle, on the school website.

During the 2012-2013 school year Battle Lake School was in phase one of the cycle for the subjects of Agriculture Science and Industrial Technology.  Due to a change in staffing, program review of these areas will take place in the fall of 2013.   Community members will examine data (state and local assessment results, teacher and community feedback) and decide on program strengths and areas for recommended improvement.

Battle Lake was in phase two of the cycle for visual arts, music, and social studies/history which involves the purchase of new curricula.   

Battle Lake School was in phase three of the cycle for the subjects of world languages, language arts, literacy, and physical education. School staff wrote and aligned curriculum to meet state or locally adopted standards and determined if additional resources and training were needed. The K-12 curriculums for world languages, language arts, literacy, and physical education can be viewed in their entirety at the above reference school website.

In 2012-2013 Battle Lake will begin phase one review in the agriculture and industrial technology subject areas.  Interested community members may contact the school if they would like to participate in the review process.  We would like to acknowledge Battle Lake classroom teachers*, administrative staff*, and the following community members for their input:

 

Eileen Weber                           Heidi Hull                                Jeanette Keeney          

Heidi Christensen                    Becky Walvatne                                                         

 

*A complete list of Battle Lake School staff can be found on the school website:  http://battlelake.k12.mn.us/

 

Music Review / Phase 1

 

Academic standards define expectations for the educational achievement of Minnesota’s public school students in grades K-12.  The interrelationship of artistic knowledge and processes defines artistic literacy.  State standards are available in the Arts, or districts may choose to develop their own.

 

Best Practices:

·         Basic Skills and Technique:  Promote and develop the basics of breathing, tone production, listening, tension free singing and technical expertise on an instrument that produce quality music.

·         Teamwork - Working together toward the common goal with respect and courtesy, a task orientation not only a personal orientation, realizing the importance of every part in the group and realizing that that importance shifts throughout the process of goal realization

·         Respect for each other, their teacher, their audience, their instrument, and the musical tradition from which the music emanates

·         Focus - Paying attention to the task at hand.  Paying attention to the leader whoever that may be - the members of your section, the director, other cast members on stage, etc.

Strengths:

Ø  We have strong performing groups.   The instruction has been sound from their early elementary classes to the present.  We hold students to high standards and they produce.    Contest results verify their quality.  

Ø  Several students have received college music scholarships in recent years.

Ø  Interaction between the Elementary, Jr. High and High School students in concerts and projects is promoted and is a very positive thing.

Ø  Community service is encouraged through performances at Veteran’s Day, Memorial Day and community functions.

Ø  The financial resource of Larry’s Supermarket through the Fine Arts Board is an extremely helpful resource!

Ø  World percussion instruments have expanded opportunities for students.

Ø  Currently available computers and software are helping students to learn about composition and make individualized instruction easier.  

Ø  Outstanding facilities – especially Royal Broberg Auditorium

 

Areas of Concern / Recommendations:

§  The 25% reduction to the Vocal Music position for 2012-2013 brings many concerns:  

v  With one less day for lessons there will not be time for Elementary Choir.

v  The recent gain of the Sr. High Musical Productions class is now gone for ‘12-‘13.

v  Mrs. Orpen is losing an hour of lesson time due to library duty.  

v  Several of the elementary classes are going to be one section.   The large groups make certain activities difficult or impossible.  

We recommend the school pursue securing additional revenue and increase instructional time for music.

 

§   Sr. High Band and Choir sharing an hour is a problem.  Those who are in both have a hard time picking up what they missed.  The shared block of time is not an easy shift for those going from a band setting into a choir setting.  We recommend moving Band and Choir back into separate hours and explore creative scheduling solutions which do not place a required class against musical opportunities.

 

§  Because decreasing enrollment of  students means smaller numbers to draw from for future bands and choirs, we recommend the music department focus on activities which increase participation such as:    

v  Bringing in students to perform for the 4th graders as they consider participation in band.

v  Continue to invite elementary classes to the Jr. High Musical and Festival.  

v  Move the 4th grade recorder unit to the spring and perform at the Elementary Band Concert.  

v  Continue creative projects such as; senior high mentoring of junior high musical, high school choir project with 5-6 grade students. 

 

§  Budget issues will continue to be a challenge in the future.  We recommend continued emphasis on fund raising to enhance instruction; attend professional theatre and music related productions (Les Miserables, Glee Festival, Barber Shop workshop, NDSU Women’s Choir Festival) etc.

 

§  Because there is currently no pay for the position of Jr. High Musical Director, we recommend the position be added to the list of co-curricular positions during the 2013-2015 contract bargaining process.

 

§  Due to the loss of teacher preparation time, we recommend elimination of the Elementary Christmas Program.

 

 

Visual Arts Review / Phase 1

 

Academic standards define expectations for the educational achievement of Minnesota’s public school students in grades K-12.  The interrelationship of artistic knowledge and processes defines artistic literacy. 

 

 

Best Practices:

      Student originality, choice, and responsibility in art making

      Stress on the process of creation, the steps and stages of careful craftsmanship

      Art as an element of talent development for all students

      Exploration of the whole array of art forms, from Western and non-Western sources, different time periods, cultures, and ethnic groups

      Support for every student’s quest to find and develop personal media, style, and tastes

      Time for art in the school day and curriculum

      Integration of arts across the curriculum

      Using art as a tool of doing, learning, and thinking

      Artists in schools, both as performers and as partners in interdisciplinary work

      Long-term partnerships with artists and arts organizations

      Teacher, principal, and parent involvement in the arts

 

Strengths:

·          A wide variety of course offerings is available in grades 7-12 including opportunities for independent study.

·         Students are able to experience multiple opportunities for juried exhibitions:

ü  Scholastics

ü  4 for Arts

ü  6A Southern Regional Art Show

  • Students have experienced high levels of success in juried exhibitions due to high quality instruction.  Over the last 5 years students have received:
                Minnesota Scholastics
                            1 National Silver medal
                            5 Gold Keys
                            6 Silver Keys
                            4 Honorable Mentions
                4 for Art Show at M-State

                        10 Merit Awards

                        1 Honorable Mention
                        Regional Art Show (only 18 pieces per year)
                                    3 Best in Shows
                                    10 Best in Category
                                    45 Superior
                                    36 Excellent

·         Student success displayed in area newspapers and other media on a consistent basis.

·         Current art instructor has secured multiple grants directly benefiting student instructional experiences:

ü  Field trip to MIA - $1,500

ü  Lakes Area Youth Art Symposium -  $3,400

ü  Elementary Art Day (nine artists, 4 years)  - $7,200

ü  Equipment Grant (pug mill) - $1,500

ü  Regional Art show workshops (2 years) - $3800

·         Instructor has strong connections to local art organization.

Areas of Concern / Recommendations:

1.  Because most K-6 instruction is delivered sporadically and lacks artistic substance, we recommend creating a scope and sequence which defines teacher activities and assessments.  This document should set minimum expectations for instruction - averaging at least one experience every two weeks.

2.  Due to the varying needs of students, we recommend incorporating strategies for differentiated instruction to insure maximum student engagement.

3. Encourage partnering with Art of the Lakes to provide additional experiences for K-6 classrooms.

Social Studies-History Review / Phase 1

Social Studies is the study of history, humanities and the social sciences. The purpose of studying these disciplines is to prepare young people to become responsible citizens and develop social understanding. Social studies standards and curriculum build four capacities in young people: disciplinary knowledge, disciplinary skills, commitment to democratic values, and citizen participation.

Strengths:

1.  Curriculum is based on state adopted standards.  These standards were developed through the review of effective programs and curricula and input from experts in the field of social studies education. Characteristics of an effective social studies curriculum include:

  • In-depth study of topics in each social studies field, in which students make choices about what to study and discover the complexities of human interaction
  • Emphasis on activities that engage students in inquiry and problem solving
  • Student decision making and participation in wider social, political, and economic affairs, so that they share a sense of responsibility for the welfare of their school and community
  • Participation in interactive and cooperative classroom study processes that bring together students of all ability levels
  • Integration of social studies with other areas of the curriculum
  • Richer content in elementary grades, building on the prior knowledge children bring to social studies topics; this includes concepts from psychology, sociology, economics, and political science, as well as history and geography; students of all ages can understand, within their experience, American social institutions, issues for social groups, and everyday problems
  • Students’ valuing and sense of connection with American and global history, the history and culture of diverse social groups, and the environment that surrounds them
  • Students’ inquiry about the cultural groups they belong to, and others represented in their school and community, to promote students’ sense of ownership in the social studies curriculum
  • Evaluation involving further learning and promotion of responsible citizenship / open expression

2.  67% (10/15) of educators delivering social studies standards have Master Degrees in education and possess strong content knowledge.

3.  Opportunities exist for students to be actively engaged, work together, and share information with others; use of smart boards, online resources, period specific music, parade of states, presidential reports, oral and power point presentations, Battle Lake historic experiences, guest speakers.  Students may earn six college credits.

4.  High School teacher has participated five years (including 2012-2013) in the Teaching American History grant program – gaining valuable resources and experiences – at no cost to the district.

Areas of Concern / Recommendations: 

1.  Several of the currently used 7-12 texts are worn and out of date.  Comments were made that the elementary series is very broad and similar to a reading text.  Recommend updating several series as determined by instructional staff.

 

FOLLOW-UP TO 2011 IMPROVEMENT PLAN

Each year the Annual Report includes an update on progress toward the previous year’s Improvement Plan.  Last year Battle Lake reviewed Language Arts, World languages, Physical Education, Health, and Science.  Recommendations were addressed as follows:

Language Arts

1.  Increase achievement by intensifying efforts to embed proven instructional strategies such as:

ü  more flexible grouping

ü  Identify learning styles

ü  Teaching skills in the context of whole and meaningful literature

ü  Writing before and after reading

ü  Primary instructional emphasis on comprehension

ü  Embed grammar instruction within context and as needed

 

District continued practices such as Author of the Month recognition and cross aged mentoring.  In addition, literacy standards have been written and adopted (starting 2012-2013) for grades 6-12 courses in science, social studies, music, art, industrial technology, agriculture, and business.  Ninety-seven percent of students passed the 9th grade MCA for writing and the percentage of our students meeting or exceeding the reading standards typically falls in the mid-upper eighty percent. 

 

2.  Estimations are that half of Minnesota’s kids aren’t ready for school at age six and the ability to acquire language and higher cognitive function peaks before the age of six.  Of 50 first grade students who are behind in reading, 44 will still be behind in grade four.  Extensive analysis by economists has shown that education and development investments in the earliest years of life produce the greatest returns.  We recommend literacy instruction and interventions be provided at the very youngest age possible.  Funding was secured to offer two sections of two day-all day instruction for the four year old school readiness program starting in 2012-2013.  Battle Lake will continue to offer three half days of instruction for three year olds.  The school readiness program increased from 26 to 30 weeks and finally, a half time Minnesota Reading Corps tutoring position (serving PreK students) was secured for the 2012-2013 school year.

4.  With new state mandated requirements to deliver literacy standards in science, social studies, and the technical subjects, time should be provided for 6th-12th grade teachers to align and embed the standards within their primary subject areas.  Completed

 

5.  Integrate community support to create additional opportunities for individualized instruction and learning.  Two MN Reading Corps positions secured for 2012-2013.

Health:

1.  Although recognizing the large class sizes (up to 43) for elementary physical education, this committee encourages participation in the Presidential Physical Fitness Awards Program.  A potential solution for data collection could be enlisting the help of community volunteers during testing.  No progress at this time. 

2.  With the elimination of the FACS (Food and Consumer Science) program, weaknesses may exist in the delivery of instruction related to nutrition, sex education, basic child care, family dynamics, personal relationships, and conflict resolution.  We recommend potentially expanding health instruction in grades 8 and 10 to a semester vs. the current quarter to ensure these needs are met.  All topics were introduced and lightly covered in grades eight and ten health courses.

3.  The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 mandates all schools in the United States receiving funds for hot lunches provide goals for overall wellness including nutrition and physical education.  Coupled with the rising obesity rates we feel Battle Lake must continue to make a concerted and honest effort in the promotion of well being.  In 2011-2012 the Battle Lake school lunch program increased the amount of fresh vegetables and fruits, served at least 50% of grains whole wheat, went from 2% to skim milk products and reduced the salt in scratch cooking.

4.  The committee recommends continued diligence in ensuring all students meet immunization requirements as set forth by the state of Minnesota.  Five students are exempt from at least some vaccine requirements due to conscientious objector waivers.  Six other students currently do not meet all vaccination requirements.

Science:

1.  ACT college readiness benchmark results show 14% of Battle Lake students in 2009 (39% state), 19% from 2010 (42% state), 32% from 2011 (43% state) and 43% from 2012 (42% state) were likely to be successful in college biology.  PLAN scores from 2008-2011 (a predictor of ACT success) show a potential weakness in physics, although Battle Lake students scored higher than the national average in all four areas tested.   Because the interpretation and analysis of data is heavily evaluated on state and national assessments, we encourage continued instructional emphasis in this area. 37% of Battle Lake students in 2012 (36% state) taking the ACT showed college readiness in all four areas:  College English, College Algebra, College Social Science and College Biology. ACT research has shown that it is the rigor of coursework – rather than simply the number of core courses – that has the greatest impact on ACT performance and college readiness.  

 

2.  State curriculum requires earth science standards be met in the high school.  This will be a challenge as current course offerings do not allow a separate earth science class in grades 9-12.  Standards will be addressed in the chemistry courses and we will continue to monitor student success in this area. A semester class in earth science is available to seniors in 2012 – 2013.

 

Physical Education:

1.  Because weight and cardiovascular equipment is aging, consider a planned refurbishment or replacement schedule.   No schedule is in place; however – a treadmill was replaced in fall 2011.

 

2.  Discussions were held on grading procedures and curriculum emphasis.  A FAQ is available upon request from the curriculum director’s office.  These topics often bring different viewpoints and we encourage continued dialogue between the community and school.  FAQ is posted on district curriculum website.

World Languages:

·         Students are encouraged to use all levels of thinking skills, e.g., they repeat, recognize and recall as well as apply, create, and predict.  We do all the above but we should work more on using our language for practical applications (the apply, create, and predict part). Specifically we should interact more with our partner school.

·         The teacher and students use a variety of print and non-print materials including authentic target language sources.   Strength - but more frequent technology (weekly) needed.  Potential goals include using technology to interact with our partner school, getting Chinese on the elementary computer lab computers so that elementary students can learn how to type in Chinese. Also, using more Chinese in the daily routines of the classroom so that they know when instructor says 跟着我 students would repeat what is said.

·           Need to introduce more authentic language sources in elementary.

·         The teacher and students communicate purposefully in the target language as listeners, speakers, readers, writers and viewers. Weakness and strength - we have conversations daily but additional instruction on usage is needed i.e.  Asking me to go to the bathroom, or get a drink of water, etc. in Chinese.

·         The teacher uses specific error correction in activities that focus on accuracy and little or no error correction in activities that focus on communication. Strength and weakness - students do communicate but need to work harder on having specific accuracy based activities (both spoken and written (too forgiving with wrong stroke order on characters).   Additional instruction on Characters and PinYin (the writing) and better, longer, and more thorough introduction to stroke order and radicals (accuracy based).

·         Culture is a natural component of instruction. Strength - more guests needed in the classroom i.e. Richard Kagan, professor emeritus of Hamline University, Meng, the Chinese teacher from Fergus Falls, any local Chinese people, and definitely wish to start a Chinese conversation table for all Chinese Speakers, or those interested in speaking Chinese (student or community members) to give people a chance to use their language in a non-classroom setting.

 

 

Staff Development Goals

2012-2013

  • The district faculty (K-12) read a book, The Fundamental 5, The Formula for Quality Instruction, by Sean Cain and Mike Laird.  The book was broken down by chapter and discussed once per month.  Teachers wrote a personal reflection on the concepts in the book as part of the relicensing requirement.
  • The district also worked in teams to support the work of the strategic plan.  
  • The district staff analyzed student test results and modified instruction, training and curriculum to address areas of concern.
  • The Response to Intervention team continued meeting with the goal to improve the delivery of instructional services which target individual student needs.

 

2011-2012

 

·         The district staff (K-12) will engage in monthly department/grade level discussions to plan/modify curriculum and improve instructional practices with the ultimate aim of improved student achievement. The online professional development tool PD 360 will be utilized within each team.  All teams will be responsible to study and reflect on one PD 360 program and to submit monthly reports.

·         Team reports must also show how teachers incorporate technology into the curriculum as a method to increase student engagement or meet a required academic standard.

·         The district staff will analyze student test results and modify instruction, training and curriculum to address areas of concern.

·         The Response to Intervention team will continue meeting with the goal to improve the delivery of instructional services which target individual student needs.

 

Teachers

PD 360 Topics

Shauna and Brian

Assessment for Learning

Dan and Amy

Achievement for Student with Special Needs

Don and Jennifer

Strategies for Secondary Social Studies

Stacy, Bret and Jean

Classroom Management: How to win Students

Andrea and Beth

Classroom Instruction that Works       Elem.

Eric and Anne

Differentiated Instruction

Josh  and Tom

Frazzled Educator's Health and Wellness Plan

Dan and Steve

Classroom Management         Secondary

Patsi and Cindy

Impacting Teaching and Learning with Brain Research

Mike and Jodi

Differentiating Instruction for all Students     Secondary

JoAnn and Cindy

Teaching Intelligent Behaviors

Kari and Jonathan

Legacy: Community Involvement

Sharon & Jen

The Art of Guided Reading

Linda and Kate

Classroom Management

David and David

Strategies for Secondary Science Teachers

Barry and Anita

Legacy: The Technology-Infused Classroom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Response to Intervention

 

Battle Lake Schools implemented a Response to Intervention framework which includes a multi-tiered system of screening, evidence-based interventions and ongoing assessment of the effectiveness of interventions. Multiple sources of information (AIMSweb, NWEA, MCA) are used to select and provide responsive instruction for students and/or groups of students who are at-risk of not making adequate progress in developing academic skills. Once selected, students in each tier receive targeted interventions only as long as necessary to remedy skills or behaviors that are below age or grade level expectations. All interventions must be scientifically research-based interventions. In the event that scientific research-based interventions are not available, evidence-based interventions should be used. Evidence-based instruction commonly refers to programs and techniques that have shown a record of success.


2012-2013 BATTLE LAKE DISTRICT TESTING PROGRAM

 

District 542 uses a variety of assessment tools to ensure its students are learning and to determine whether its instructional program is effective. Assessment results compared over time help teachers monitor individual student achievement as well as help the district evaluate its academic programs and plan for improvement.

 

OBJECTIVES/USE OF RESULTS

TEST

GRADES

Monitor student achievement and inform instructional decisions

Assess the curriculum and guide curriculum planning and instruction

Place students in special programs

Generate information for school improvement

NWEA Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) Assessments

    Early Literacy and Early Numeracy Screening

    Skills Checklist for Primary

    MAP for Reading, Math, Language Usage, and Science

 

 

K

 

1

2-8

Monitor student achievement and inform instructional decisions

Place students in special programs

Generate information for school improvement

AIMSweb

Achievement Improvement Monitoring System

 

K-6

Comply with federally-required accountability

Measure student progress toward achievement of the MN Academic Standards

Generate information for school improvement and school accountability

Guide curriculum planning and instruction

Place students in special programs

Minnesota Comprehensive Assessments (MCA’s):

    Reading and Math

    Reading

    Math

    Science

 

 

3-8

10

11

5, 8, 10

Certify students for graduation

Graduation Required Assessments for Diploma (GRAD)*

    Writing

    Reading

    Math

 

 

9

10

11

Determine student aptitudes, interest

Assist students with post-secondary planning

Minnesota Career Information System (MCIS) Interest Inventory

PLAN

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) (Voluntary)

9

 

10

11

Serve the needs of college bound students

ACT (Voluntary)

SAT (Voluntary)

11-12

11-12

 

*Students who do not achieve a passing score on the first administration of the GRAD assessments are allowed to retest through their senior year, so these assessments may also be given in grades following the initial administration.

 

SCHOOL DATA CENTER

 

The Minnesota Department of Education’s Data Center is designed to provide parents, educators, schools, districts and citizens with easy access to test results, revenue and expenditure data, demographic information and other critical data in a centralized location. You can access any of this data on this easy to use website: http://education.state.mn.us/MDEAnalytics/Reports.jsp